Two legs with plaque spots wearing socks and shoes. Flames are bursting over the tops of the shoes.

Summer Psoriasis

Have you ever noticed that your psoriasis does better or worse in the summer months? If you have had psoriasis for a long time then you should be able to tell when it gets better or worse.

After seventeen years of dealing with plaques that have never fully gone away, I can tell you that I know which is better. I love the winter but my psoriatic arthritis doesn't. The cold air just cuts right to my bones.

Fall and spring are great times of the year for me. With it being not so hot or not so cold, I can be outside and enjoy the beautiful days. But wait you say I missed one season. Well, the title should have given the topic away. Living in the south, summers here can be brutal. Like, for instance, all these next week temperatures are supposed to be in the 90s.

My story of psoriasis since my diagnosis

As I said I have had psoriasis for seventeen years. When I think back on it the first psoriasis patch actually started in the summer. I had been out working on my yard.

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I thought maybe I had gotten into some poison ivy when I saw that the first plaque come up. Two weeks later, I am in my doctor's office having him check it out.

Luckily for me, this doctor knew what psoriasis was and looked like. He sent me to a dermatologist to confirm it. He was right. It was psoriasis and the rest, as they say, is history. My history of seventeen years.

Not once in this whole time have I been clear. There have always been plaques. I was finally on a biologic that was doing great but wouldn't you know it a new diagnosis of ulcerative colitis done that in.

Dreading the summer months with psoriasis

Now here I sit thinking about summer fast approaching. No biologic treatment that was working well. I am back to the old trusty topicals that have never done anything for me.

I am waiting on a test to be done to confirm the ulcerative colitis so that we know which way to go with the treatment of my plaque psoriasis. Herein lies the problem. I have been waiting almost three months now to get the test done.

At this point, they cannot even give me a date when it might happen. That means that I have to go through the summer only being able to use topicals. Needless to say, I am dreading the summer now more and more. I will be in the house for the summer months.

The effects of the heat on my psoriasis

With temperatures already hitting 90 degrees next week, it makes me fearful that this will be one long hot summer. Summer is not even here yet according to the calendar. However, I beg to differ.

How many of you would agree with me that 90 degrees sound like summer to you? The later the Summer gets, the hotter and worse my psoriasis will get. Sweat rolling down into the plaque psoriasis patches are awful. It burns like putting alcohol on a sore does.

I don't dare to wear sandals because my feet have active areas of psoriasis. That means that I am stuck wearing shoes in the summer. Even the lightest of shoes are still hot when coupled with a pair of socks. You see my ankles have psoriasis too so wearing shoes without socks is a no go. Hot air equals hot feet.

A summer spent indoors

What a dreadful thought. Summer spent indoors when the temps get hot. An air conditioner running to keep me cool at all times. At this point, I think we can all say we are sick of being inside. Sad but true when dealing with psoriasis.

I will have to wait to go outside late in the afternoons when it is much cooler. At least with being home I can go barefoot if I choose to. So tell me do you find one season more troublesome to you?

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