Top 5 Products for Psoriasis Spring 2017

Within the PlaquePsoriasis.com community there are always recommendations for products/services that have worked for you, outside prescription medication. In the interest of sharing these suggestions with a wider platform, this is the first of many “Favorite Things” articles you’ll be seeing on the site. In these, we’ll recap some of the top recommendations we’ve received from you, our community members! Even though we’ll be linking out to the specific products or services that you have suggested, we are not affiliated with these products and we don’t receive any financial compensation from the companies for sharing them (but if someone wants to ship me free samples, I won’t say no!). We hope you enjoy, and as always, keep those suggestions coming! So without further ado, let’s recap the top 5 products for Spring 2017 that you say help you manage your psoriasis symptoms:

Bag balm

We know that for psoriasis sufferers, keeping skin hydrated and moisturized is essential. Dry skin leads to cracking and bleeding and exacerbates symptoms. Bag Balm has been around for more than 100 years and capitalizes on two main ingredients for locking in moisture: petroleum jelly and lanolin. Their balm comes in signature green tins and they have a great backstory (bonus: if you have cows, apparently it’s great on their udders?)

Gold Bond Ultimate Psoriasis Relief Cream

As far as OTC creams and potions go, many of you recommend Gold Bond’s Psoriasis Relief Cream to help control symptoms. In addition to helping you stay moisturized, it claims to help control itching with 3% salicylic acid in its signature formula. I personally haven’t tried this cream, but Gold Bond’s bread and butter is itch relief, so I may just pick some up in the future (though points deducted for having the actor in your promo video applying the cream to skin with no trace of psoriasis!).

SAL3 soap

To follow up on the salicylic acid in Gold Bond, did you know that you can buy soap with salicylic acid? I did not! SAL3 Salicylic Acid and Sulfur soap is vegan, and with a 3% salicylic acid and 10% sulfur content, claims to reduce inflammatory skin conditions when used regularly (and they insist it does not smell like rotten eggs, in case you were wondering). With free shipping in the USA and Canada, I’ll give it a spin.

Biofreeze

This might be a great product if you’re looking for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis relief all in one shot. Marketed for relieving aches and arthritis pain using the cooling effects of menthol, a couple community members related they accidentally discovered Biofreeze is great for relieving psoriasis itching as well. These community members use the Biofreeze spray, but they have a wide range of applications. Full disclosure, Biofreeze does not recommend you apply their product to irritated skin (haha), proceed with caution.

All-Purpose “Mom’s Stuff” Pinion Salve

This was a recent recommendation and definitely something I’ll be ordering in the future. Ingredients include fancy sounding things like “wild harvested pinion pine pitch” and tea tree essential oil (which is a psoriasis fave). There are some positive reviews on the site from people with psoriasis, so with no junk filler ingredients it may even be worth the $29.00 it costs for a small jar. If you try this out, please let me know if you smell like a forest afterward (I can’t imagine pine pitch smelling like anything other than a forest!).

Community bonus recipe

One of our members suggests dissolving 1 TBSP of baking soda in 20oz water and applying to your scalp in the shower to prevent scalp flares. Warning: if you color your hair, it will strip the color out.

Have any of you tried the above products? What are your reviews? If there’s something you’d like to see here in a future article, send it our way.

Wishing you all an itch-free day (and may your cows’ udders be ever smooth).

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The PlaquePsoriasis.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Comments

Poll