Oil dropping into colorful water surrounded by leaves

Aromatherapy as a Complimentary Psoriasis Treatment

Essential oils have been around as long as the mountains, just in a different form. When we were sick, my mom would whip out the oils, concoct us a mixture and make sure it was used correctly.

They almost always worked, very effectively too. So much so that as an adult I have chosen to keep them in my world. I use them on an almost daily basis. So when it comes to my psoriasis I have chosen to use them to complement my ongoing treatment.

Aromatherapy and essential oils

Before we get started I would like to remind you that this is in no way medical advice. This is based purely on my personal experience. Essential oils like anything else can be harmful when not used correctly. The potency of which is often underrated.

There are a few firm favorite oils for me. They are good for my skin and smell so fantastic, I cannot help but want to use them. So here is my list and what I use them for.

  • Tea tree: Antimicrobial, fungicide, anti-viral and an immuno-stimulant.
  • Lavender: Antiseptic, antiviral, decongestant, sedative, and great for minor burns.
  • Geranium: Antiseptic, antidepressant and a perfume.
  • Bergamot: Analgesic, antidepressant and antiseptic.
  • Peppermint: Analgesic, a digestive stimulant and an antiseptic.
  • Frankincense: Anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and a digestive stimulant
  • Ylang-Ylang: Sedative, antiseptic, antidepressant and a perfume.

Please be sure to patch test and contact your doctor before adding any alternative therapies to your current treatment regime. I was lucky enough to grow up in a home where essential oils were simply a part of our everyday lives.

How to use essential oils

In addition to a diffuser, there are a variety of ways to enjoy the relief and comfort that essential oils provide. With a basic understanding of safety precautions and application methods, it is easy to start using essential oils.

Mist spray bottle

Essential oils easily penetrate the skin for localized benefits, making topical application a great way to experience the benefits of essential oils.

Peppermint oil diluted with some clean water (5 drops to a medium spray bottle) is rather relieving when your skin is itchy. It creates a lovely cooling effect.  

Baths

Due to not being able to apply the oil directly to my skin (it makes me itch), I would use all of the above in healing baths. No more than 3 oils at a time, and only 3-4 drops of each. Add in some Epsom salts (1-2 cups per bath) and just lay in the water and soak. 20–45 minutes to make a really good soak time for me. Always remember to moisturize afterward.

Add the salt to the hot water, then add the cooler water and the essential oils, as you don’t want them destroyed by the heat of the water. Make sure you swish the water nicely before you get in.

Compress

Folding of a piece of material, bandage, or small towel, into a pad wetting it, and applying it to the areas to be treated. I prefer to use a cold compress as I find it very soothing for sore skin.

In a bowl mix, 2 drops each of your favorite two oils and soak the cloth in the cold water. I find refrigerated is best. This can be very helpful to increase blood flow too.

Trying aromatherapy for psoriasis

As you try different oils, you will learn which essential oils work best for you and your needs. For the best essential oil experience, it is important to use oils that are pure, potent, and safe.

If you are currently using essential oils to treat your psoriasis, I would love to hear from you. What you use and how you use it. Please reach out and join in the conversation.

By providing your email address, you are agreeing to our privacy policy. We never sell or share your email address.

More on this topic

This article represents the opinions, thoughts, and experiences of the author; none of this content has been paid for by any advertiser. The PlaquePsoriasis.com team does not recommend or endorse any products or treatments discussed herein. Learn more about how we maintain editorial integrity here.

Join the conversation

or create an account to comment.