Psoriasis Has My Back...Literally

I was enjoying a nice, warm shower and thinking to myself "wow, I'm pretty clear right now, this is great!" Then my plaque psoriasis snuck up on me.

Psoriasis has my back

Aside from my scalp flaring pretty constantly, my body had stayed clear of spots for some time now. That was until I looked back in the mirror. There it was. A big old spot right in the center of my back. "What the...where did you come from!?" was my first thought. My second was... "how in the world am I going to reach you?"

So, being me, I did some internet research. I knew what to put on it but I wasn't sure how.

Then it occurred to me that I had been using one of those loofah's on a stick for a while now. So, why couldn't I use the same type of tool to apply my creams and lotions?

How do you treat back psoriasis?

I treat my back just like any other part of my body when it has plaque psoriasis. For me, tar-based soaps are great, low and natural-ingredient lotions and scrubs and any medicated creams I am given.

Everyone has a different group of things that works for them. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

How we apply treatment for back psoriasis?

I'm a fan of back lotion applicators. Yes, it's annoying to have another tool lying around your bathroom and I wouldn't normally recommend adding to your bathroom bucket of "stuff" but I found it a necessary tool in applying creams and medicine on hard-to-reach places.

I purchased two: one for my lotion and one for my medicine. I didn't want to mix the two so I also labeled each one. Choose one that is comfortable to handle and easy on your skin.

How to choose a lotion applicator for back psoriasis

Some applicators have a roller, some have a sponge, and some even look like a really skinny towel with handles that you just put behind your back and wipe from side-to-side to apply. So far, I like the simple and soft sponge applicator but I'll tell you about all three.

Rolling applicator

With these applicators, you simply open up the rolling area and fill it with your lotion. If you go with this one, try and find one with removable balls so you can wash the balls and handle them separately. What people seem to like most about these are that they evenly distribute the lotion. What they seem to like least is that the balls don't always roll effectively.

Sponge applicator

Sponge applicators look similar to loofah-like applicators that you use in the shower and come on a stick. For applying lotion, the sponge is softer on the skin because you're applying not scrubbing.

Make sure you choose the correct applicator. Make sure your sponge is easy to clean and with all applicators make sure your handle is long enough to reach all the necessary places.

Towel-like Applicator

Imagine you just got out of the shower and you started drying off your back. I always place the towel behind me and, with my hands, rub it side-to-side on my back to dry off. This type of applicator does something very similar, only it rubs lotion on, it doesn't take water off.

From various reviews of different applicators, some people loved it because of the even distribution and massage-feel. Others didn't care for the handles on either end. This is why I didn't purchase it. I couldn't see it being comfortable on my psoriatic arthritis hands.

Who else has your back?

Maybe you don't need an applicator! Maybe you're lucky enough to have a very nice friend, partner, spouse, family member who doesn't mind getting their hands dirty.

I'll tell you one thing though, they'll definitely take up more space in the bathroom than a lotion applicator. Splurge. Ya know, just in case you could use the extra space and alone time.

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