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Does psoriasis affect your social life?

Psoriasis can often be a very visible condition, usually leading to stigma and discomfort among patients in social settings. This is a space to talk about how psoriasis affects our social lives and our interactions with others.

Does it change when in familiar, close-friend, groups? What about in a large group of strangers? How does psoriasis affect you socially?

  1. Hello , It sure does. The only good thing for me is that I'm older and I don't let this stuff bother me anymore. But back in the day; I covered up from head to toe. It could be 100 degrees out, but I refuse to show my skin. I believe most of this came from my teenage years. I've lost count of how people treated me back then.


    I went to a gala recently. I was having a very bad flare; over 80% of my body was showing. This was probably the first time in my life that I didn't cover up and I didn't care what people had to say. The good thing was that this was more of a mature group, so they knew how to act. On the inside, they might have been thinking something, but on the outside, I got "mad" respect and hugs.


    Right now, I am living my best life.


    Diane (Team Member)

    1. I get it. It’s something about being young and just unaware and unknowing of certain things that makes some young people judgmental because something doesn’t “look normal” to them. But of course that goes back to the lack of awareness too. But like you said, with age comes maturity and a better level of respect because we can look pass someone’s differences and see them for who they are. Plus having the confidence and courage to not care what others think regardless is a true characteristic to have so that’s good that you have that. Continue to live cheerful and unashamed! All the best, Latoya (Team Member)

      1. Hello , thanks for the kind response. And you are so right, when we're young we worry about what others think. I had a hard time just telling people what psoriasis was back in the day. I made up all kinds of things, had poison ivy, got burnt, drank too many sodas, etc. It took me many years to have confidence and courage. It was my grandkids who helped me with this. They always wanted to go swimming. I had to grow with them. I couldn't let them go in the water all by themselves, could I?


        Thank you again, sometimes it's the little things that matter and what a person says. You are truly a great advocate. Diane (Team Member)

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